Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Five Important Outdoor Spring Maintenance Tasks

Nothing like getting outside after a long winter. It’s so invigorating, even household chores are refreshing. So while you’re reveling in clean spring air, get after these simple maintenance jobs that fend off potential moisture problems, prevent costly repairs, and pave the way for a trouble-free summer.

Clean Out Gutters and Downspouts

It is really important to make sure gutters and downspouts remain bonded to the home. Every spring it is necessary to check for loose downspouts and sagging gutters.

Inspect Your Roof

It’s always a good idea to inspect your roof annually for wear and damage. Winters are often hard on roofs. Check to make sure that shingles are all in good condition. Look for areas where moisture may have crept in. Be on the lookout for algae, fungi and mold, all of which can cause serious damage if not removed. Certain types of mold also cause health problems. Be especially vigilant for wear near your pipes.

Clean Your Siding

Clean siding with a pressure washer to keep mold from growing. Check all wood surfaces for weathering and paint failure. If wood is showing through, sand the immediate area and apply a primer coat before painting. If paint is peeling, scrape loose paint and sand smooth before painting.

Inspect Your Windows

Leakage around windows will admit warm summer air and let cooled indoor air escape, so be sure to check that any caulking and weather stripping you have in place has remained intact. “A tight seal is the first line of defense against air and water,” says Marty Davis, marketing manager, Simonton Windows, Columbus, OH. If you experienced condensation inside the glass on double- or triple-glazed windows during the winter months, the weather seal has been compromised, and either the glass or the window will need to be replaced.

Inspect Driveways and Paths

Freezing and thawing is rough on concrete, asphalt and other hardscaping materials. Take a walk around your property to look for damage to walkways, paths and driveways, and schedule repairs as needed. Asphalt can often be patched, but damaged concrete may need to be replaced entirely.

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